Friday, September 28, 2012

Sukkot

The Hebrew month of Tishrei offers quite the set list!  Immediately following Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is Sukkot.  This holiday begins on Sunday evening and marks the Israelites wandering through the wilderness and living in these temporary shelters.

This month provides us with a record setting concert.  Year after year it is the same.  Rosh Hashanah.  Yom Kippur.  Sukkot.  Simhat Torah.  There is an interesting tradition that even before breaking Yom Kippur’s fast, one is supposed to place the first board on the sukkah.  Like the best of concerts there is no pause between songs.  We move from the introspection of Yom Kippur to the rejoicing of Sukkot.  The two holidays are bound to each other.  The joy of Sukkot takes over.    

The inwardness of Yom Kippur is transformed by the earthiness of Sukkot.  We let go of our sins and wrongdoings.  We turn to the world.  Whereas Yom Kippur is all about prayer and repentance, Sukkot is about our everyday world.  Its mandate is to celebrate our everyday blessings. 

What is its most important mitzvah?  Leishev basukkah—to live in the sukkah.  We are commanded to eat our meals in the sukkah and even sleep in the sukkah.  For one week our lives move from our beautiful homes to these temporary shelters.  The sukkah must be temporary in its character.  If it is too comfortable then it is not a sukkah.  If it provides too much shelter then it defeats the meaning of Sukkot.

Central to this definition of the sukkah is the schach, the roof.  One must be able to see the stars through its lattice.  So what does one do if it rains?  What happens to living in the sukkah if the weather is uncomfortable?  The rabbis are clear in their answer.  Go inside!  A temporary shelter cannot protect us from the rains.  A temporary shelter should not protect us.  Its fragility is part of its message.

Even more important than the sukkah’s temporary quality is the joy of the holiday.  It is no fun to sleep outside in the rain.  It is no fun to be eating outside during a late fall sukkot.  One’s joy would be diminished.   First and foremost this day is about rejoicing.  We rejoice in the gifts of this world.  We celebrate the bounty of creation. 

Living in these temporary shelters helps to remind us of these blessings.  After a long day of fasting and praying, Sukkot comes to remind us of the blessings that surround us each and every day.  Sitting outside in our sukkot, we look at the blessings of our homes.  We relish the blessings of nature.  We rejoice in fall breezes, the changing of the leaves and the full moon that will peer through the lattice on Sunday evening.

We breathe a sigh of relief after the exhaustion of beating our chests and examining our ways.  The moon brightens the evening.  We sing and laugh as we gather around the table in our sukkah.  We rejoice!

The set list continues next week with Simhat Torah…

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